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Posts Tagged ‘identity and food’

Sometimes I wish being the person I want to be was as simple as setting the resolution and waking the next day to feel myself transformed. While self-reflection is at the heart of many successful practices like religion, meditation, sports performance and professional development it can sometimes feel less than rewarding.

Example:
Step 1- Set general and glorious expectation.
Step 2- Fail at executing expectation, or worse yet, forget the goal.
Step 3- Reprimand self for failing to meet above expectation.

Rinse and repeat. After repeated cycles one may begin to wonder if it’s the expectation or the lack of discipline in the execution. In reality, it’s likely that the goal itself is so big and so general that the project is doomed from the start, like willing oneself to grow an elephant foot. It just doesn’t work like that, and perhaps thankfully so. The challenge is to keep positive and keep persevering.

We had the windows open the other night as a gaggle of young humans were waddling by when we heard this:

Gramma, Grrrrramma! I love walking by this house, there’s always someone cooking!!

I brightened.
I blushed.
I beamed.

And I thought: Does cooking makes me a better version of myself? We should all be reminded what things we do that we can be proud of (even if it’s a child’s voice floating in the window)… that we wouldn’t mind people peeking into our lives and taking note. Much like taking stock of what’s on hand in the kitchen, we must also inventory our personal larder in order to know what makes us special and to continue growing and moving forward. Good recipes offer us a step by step instruction manual for success and we’re rewarded with an effort that is greater than the sum of its parts because it allows us to put into action simple values statements.

Food (finding or cooking) provides little moments that reinforce the things we do that define us. A daily pronouncement of what we believe, what we prioritize. That could be eating local, not eating meat, finding the best restaurants, doing the best you can on a budget, making sure your busy family comes together for dinner, focusing on fruits and vegetables, getting your kids involved in the kitchen…
For me, just making food, making good choices about where it comes from and putting on the table with love are my hallmarks. That’s an identity to channel everyday… and much easier than growing an elephant foot.

I‘m a Good Person Butternut Squash Soup with Life is Delicious Grilled Goat Cheese Sandwiches


For the soup:
Peel and cut into chunks two medium butternut squash. Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast in a 400 degree oven for 40 minutes. Meanwhile heat a medium pan over medium heat with two tablespoons butter, when it foams add thin slices of half a large onion, one chopped rib of celery, 1 chile de arbol, 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds, 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon, 1 teaspoon salt and some freshly ground pepper. Sautee until lightly caramelized. Add squash pieces and stir. Turn the heat to medium high and splash in 1/4 cup dry sherry, reduce for 3 minutes. Add six cups of water to the pot and allow to simmer for 30 minutes. Puree carefully and keep warm on the stove while finishing the sandwiches.

For the sandwiches:
Heat small sautee pan with 2 tablespoons butter, when it foams add thin slices of one half a large onion. Sautee on low heat stirring occasionally until deeply browned, about 30 minutes. Remove onions from pan and wipe with a paper towel.
Meanwhile slice a good quality loaf of bread, as much as you think you will need for as many people as you are serving. Lightly butter one side of each slice. Smear the other side of each bread with a thin layer of goat cheese (honey-lavender is amazing), carmelized onion, several pieces of spring mix (or spinach) and then top with another slice of bread with cheese facing the onion and buttered side facing up. Place in warm skillet over medium heat, cooking each side until golden brown and cheese is starting to melt.






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