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Posts Tagged ‘beet greens’


I hear it all the time:
Is this a beet?
It’s sooo good!
I even didn’t think I liked beets!

Well, I’ve got news for you people, the beet is your friend. It is your friend not only because it is nourishing to your body, beautiful to look upon but (dun, dun, DUN!) easy to prepare. Oh, and lest I forget (!)… it’s also a permanent two-for-one-deal.

I know, I KNOW… you’re still picturing a buttered beet side dish that came out of a can served to you by Great Aunt Hilda. Delete that from memory bank immediately and permanently because beets are pretty, well sexy.

Picture bright half moons of earthy sweetness in a salad with your favorite fixin’s like blue cheese and walnuts, lobster and avocado or oranges and mint. Even just served sliced and drizzled with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, they make an elegant side dish. This is all easy-peasy when you have some roasted beets on hand in the fridge.

My beet protocol is something like this: Buy beets at the farmers market. Preferably smaller ones but I look most intently at the greens attached making sure they are bright and healthy looking. On that day or the next, when I happen to have the oven hot for something else I snip the greens from the root, leaving about an inch of stem attached to the beet and then prepare as described below and toss into the fridge for use throughout the week. Featured in salads usually or always a nice addition to the plate when you need a bit of color to round things out.

Now for this two-for-one bit I mentioned earlier… don’t throw away those greens! Once snipped from their bulbus counterpart remove the green part of the leaf from the pinkish stems and wash throughly. Then just treat like spinach (or any soft green): saut√©ed lightly in olive oil, garlic and chile is the most straightforward way.

So if that, all that, is not enough beets also make a delightful raw salad. If you were to tell me to shred a couple of pounds of root vegetables on a box grated I would likely give you a sour look. Fortunately beet salad can be prepared entirely in the food processor, then transferred to a salad bowl with dressing ingredients thrown on top and just mixed in. Once prepared it’s stunningly beautiful, perfect for summer potlucks. As a recent diner at our house commented, I’m pretty sure it makes you healthier just looking at it. The taste is so simple and delicious it will leave you feeling great about yourself and the food you just made.

Also, short notes on color for beginners: Handling cooked red beets may leave you looking like you had a run-in with your kitchen knife. Not to worry, washing as soon as possible will likely remove all red juice. The same goes for your cutting board. If it is being stubborn though you may pour some kosher salt on your hands making a paste with water, this exfoliant should get the last of it and leave your flanges nice and soft. Internally your body has a similar dilemma and you may notice some coloration when you use the bathroom. Please do not call your doctor frantically as my co-worker did.

Roasted Beets

1 or 2 bunches beets, preferably of similar size

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Trim stems, leaving about one inch attached to the root. Wash beets.
Lay beets on a large square of tin foil and drizzle lightly with olive oil. If using different colors of beets, be sure to wrap in separate packages.
Wrap foil tightly around beets and place in hot oven.
Bake for approximately 60 minutes, they are done when you can poke with the tip of a knife and meet little resistance. Smaller beets take about 45 minutes, larger ones can take closer to 90 minutes.
They’re pretty gracious little buggers though so don’t fret too much about the exact timing.
Remove from oven, when cool skins slip easily away.
Beets can then be served or stored in the refrigerator.

Raw Beet Salad
Adapted from Mark Bittman

1 1/2 pounds beets (approx.)
1 large shallot
1 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard, or to taste
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons sherry or white vinegar
1 sprig fresh herbs like tarragon, mint or thyme (optional)
1/3 cup chopped parsley or cilantro

Peel beets and shallot, place in food processor and pulse until chopped but not pureed. You could also shred with a box grater or mince by hand. Mix in a bowl with remaining ingredients and salt and pepper to taste.

Ultimately, it’s not your grandmothers beet.
But, it should be yours, you just might like it.

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